Jagmohan Dalmiya doesn't see any hope for DRS in present form

Decision Review SystemIndia were part of the first-ever Test series involving DRS, on their tour to Sri Lanka in 2008. But their players weren't happy with the experience, and almost the entire team voted against the system

Despite the flaws in the Decision Review System that have been revealed during an Ashes series full of umpiring controversies, the International Cricket Council (ICC) has continued to back the system vociferously. Also read: Clarke defends players, KP 'infuriated' after silicone allegations

A recent report, in fact, has claimed that the ICC has made progress in convincing the hitherto sceptical Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to accept a modfied version of DRS during bilateral series involving India. Interim BCCI president Jagmohan Dalmiya, however, rubbishes these claims.

"We will accept DRS when technology is foolproof. There's nothing in between. Full stop," Dalmiya said. "Let them come up with a system which is 100 per cent correct. They couldn't fix the Duckworth-Lewis problem in 15 years, what guarantee do we have about an error-free DRS? The Duckworth-Lewis method is beyond most of the players and administrators, let alone the common fans. I am still trying to figure out how can a team total be increased on basis of projection. The whole process is very complicated and confusing. And rather than solving the riddle, DRS creates more confusion in its present form." Also read: Men have failed the machine

India were part of the first-ever Test series involving DRS, on their tour to Sri Lanka in 2008. But their players weren't happy with the experience, and almost the entire team voted against the system. Ever since then, the BCCI has supported the players. Also read: ICC dismisses reports on investigation into players

BCCI's president-in-exile N Srinivasan's opposition to DRS was one of the main reasons why the ICC failed to make it mandatory in all bilateral series. With Srinivasan watching from the sidelines, a section of the ICC and at least one cricket board tried to persuade Dalmiya to take a soft-line approach when he attended the parent board's Annual Conference held in London this June. Also read: Umpire strikes back

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