Capital gains taxation and taxpayers: 3 steps to stop taxes from gaining on your capital

TaxesMost of us invest monetary surplus in assets such as shares, bonds, property, precious metals, etc. (Thinkstock)

Most of us invest our monetary surplus in assets such as shares, bonds, immovable property, precious metals, etc. Income from these assets is taxable in the hands of all taxpayers, including individuals, as capital gains tax.

Here, we look at the basic concept of capital gains taxation with regard to individual taxpayers.

Investments made by individuals in aforesaid assets can either be held for use or to earn profits by selling them later at a higher price. Generally, for capital gains to arise, there should be disposal of a 'capital asset' as more specifically defined under tax regulations. Any gain arising on disposal of such assets could be taxed as capital gains.

Capital gains can be either short-term or long-term in nature, depending upon the time period for which the disposed asset is held by the seller. The significance of identifying the nature of capital gains is two-fold: Firstly, to check the possibility of claiming benefit of enhanced cost of acquisition to compute the amount of gains and, secondly, to determine the tax rate applicable on such gains. Here is a snapshot on taxability of gains on following capital assets:

Immovable properties

Specified agricultural land is not considered as a capital asset and, hence, no capital gains tax liability arises on its transfer. For other properties, excess of sale proceeds over the cost of its acquisition is taxable as capital gains. If the property is held for more than three years immediately before the date of transfer, the tax rate will be 20% after applying benefits of enhanced cost; else the entire gain will be taxed at normal slab rates, without any benefit of enhanced cost.

Shares in a company

Profit arising on shares traded on a recognised stock exchange on which Securities Transaction Tax (STT) is paid is exempt if such shares were held by the investor for a period exceeding a year. Otherwise, a special tax rate of 15% is applicable. In case of unlisted shares, long-term gains (where the period of holding exceeds one year) are taxable at 20% whereas short-term gains are taxed normally.

... contd.

Please read our terms of use before posting comments
TERMS OF USE: The views, opinions and comments posted are your, and are not endorsed by this website. You shall be solely responsible for the comment posted here. The website reserves the right to delete, reject, or otherwise remove any views, opinions and comments posted or part thereof. You shall ensure that the comment is not inflammatory, abusive, derogatory, defamatory &/or obscene, or contain pornographic matter and/or does not constitute hate mail, or violate privacy of any person (s) or breach confidentiality or otherwise is illegal, immoral or contrary to public policy. Nor should it contain anything infringing copyright &/or intellectual property rights of any person(s).
comments powered by Disqus