Short course: Viagra may also combat obesity, says study

Viagra may also combat obesity, says study

BERLIN: Viagra — the common male potency enhancer drug — may also fight obesity by busting the unseemly fat around the abdomen, a new research has claimed. Researchers from the University of Bonn, who treated mice with drug, discovered the signalling pathway by which Viagra might be able to fight excess weight. They said the drug converts undesirable white fat cells and could thus potentially melt the unwelcome "spare tire" around the midriff. In addition, the substance also decreases the risk of other complications caused by obesity, according to the study published in the FASEB Journal. Sildenafil — better known as Viagra — is used to treat erectile dysfunction. This substance prevents degradation of cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP), which then ensures blood supply for an erection. However, another effect of Viagra has been noticed quite some time ago — mice given sildenafil over longer periods of time were resistant to obesity when fed with high-fat diet.

Enzyme involved in deadly brain tumours identified

WASHINGTON: Scientists have discovered that a naturally occurring enzyme promotes survival of malignant

brain tumour cells. Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified an important association between the naturally occurring enzyme Kallikrein 6, also known as KLK6 and glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most common types of brain tumours in adults. "Our study of Kallikrein 6 showed that higher levels of this enzyme in the tumour are negatively associated with patient survival, and that the enzyme functions by promoting the survival of tumour cells," said senior author Isobel Scarisbrick, of Mayo Clinic's Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. The findings introduce a new avenue for potential treatment of deadly glioblastomas: targeting the function of KLK6. The tumour cells became more susceptible to treatment when researchers blocked the receptors where the KLK6 enzyme can dock and initiate the survival signal. The study was published in the journal Neuro-Oncology.

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