Sprint's Hall of Shame: Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell test positive

Tyson Gayyson Gay of the U.S. reacts after finishing fourth in the men's 100m final during the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium in this August 5, 2012 file photo. U.S. 100 metres record holder Tyson Gay said on July 14, 2013 he had tested positive for a substance he could not identify and was pulling out of next month's world championships. (Reuters)

American 100-metre record holder Tyson Gay, who had promoted himself as a clean athlete, tested positive for a banned substance and said he will pull out of the world championships next month in Moscow.

Elsewhere on Sunday, former 100m world-record holder Asafa Powell and Jamaican teammate Sherone Simpson both tested positive for banned stimulants, according to their agent. Paul Doyle told The Associated Press on Sunday that they tested positive for the stimulant oxilofrine at the Jamaican championships and were just recently notified.

Powell helped the Jamaicans to the 400-meter relay gold medal at the 2008 Olympics and was the last man to hold the individual 100 record before countryman Usain Bolt broke it earlier that year. Simpson won Olympic gold in the women's 400 relay in 2004 and silver in 2012, along with an individual silver in the 100 in 2008.

Gay, who finished fourth in the London Olympics, wouldn't reveal the substance in a phone conversation from Amsterdam on Sunday, but he said he was notified by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) late last week that a sample came back positive from a May 16 out-of-competition test. He said he will have his 'B' sample tested soon, possibly as early as this week.

"I don't have a sabotage story. I don't have any lies. I don't have anything to say to make this seem like it was a mistake or it was on USADA's hands, someone playing games," said Gay, who fought back sobs as he spoke. "I don't have any of those stories. I basically put my trust in someone and I was let down."

Asked who that person was, Gay replied: "I can't really say it. Sometimes a human being naturally, generally trusts somebody. That's what people do."

USATF CEO Max Siegel said in a statement: "It is not the news anyone wanted to hear, at any time, about any athlete. "We do not know the facts of this case and look to USADA to adjudicate it and handle it appropriately."

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